7. 'AKA' - What Does It Mean?


What Does 'AKA' Mean?

'AKA' means 'Also Known As'.

We have attempted to use the formal name of a parish in its listing. By 'formal name', we mean the name by which a parish was canonically erected, usually also the name by which it was legally incorporated or chartered.

However, there are instances in which a parish is commonly or frequently known by an alternative name, which may be a variant styling or a shortened form.

  • Examples: Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary versus Dormition of the Theotokos or St Mary's versus Protection of the Holy Theotokos

While such variants may be obvious to parishioners and those familiar with the Eastern Churches, they may be less so to a visitor searching for a parish known only by its informal name. As a result, in instances where a parish has a common alternative name, we list that name, preceded by 'AKA'.


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Teachings of Christ

“I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. (John 14:6 ESV)

Theophany

When You were baptized in the Jordan, O Lord, * worship of the Trinity was revealed, * for the Father's voice bore witness to You, calling You His “beloved Son”, * and the Spirit in the form of a dove confirmed the certainty of these words. * O Christ God, * Who appeared and enlightened the world, glory to You! (Troparion, Tone 1)

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, now and ever and to the ages of ages. Amen.

You have appeared to the whole world today, * and Your light, O Lord, is signed upon us, * who with knowledge sing praise to You: * "You have come, and You have appeared, O Unapproachable Light." (Kontakion, Tone 4)

Random Proverb

The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; fools despise wisdom and instruction. (Proverbs 1:7 ESV)

Pray Without Ceasing

Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.

Wisdom from the Church Fathers

"'And [Naaman] dipped himself . . . seven times in the Jordan' [2 Kgs. 5:14]. It was not for nothing that Naaman of old, when suffering from leprosy, was purified upon his being baptized, but [this served] as an indication to us. For as we are lepers in sin, we are made clean, by means of the sacred water and the invocation of the Lord, from our old transgressions, being spiritually regenerated as new-born babes, even as the Lord has declared: `Except a man be born again through water and the Spirit, he shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven.'"

St. Irenaeus of Lyons (190 AD), Fragment 34