The following is the beginning of a list of of all Byzanitne Catholic and other Eastern Catholic Monasteries in the United States and Canada. We know we are missing several, and would appreciate if you woud send the information for any that we've missed us for inclusion here.

 

Byzantine Catholic (Greek Catholic)

Monasteries for Men:

Monastries for Women:

  • Ohio (Burton): Christ the Bridegroom Monastery
  • Ohio (Warren): This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • New York (Sloatsburg): Servants of Mary Immaculate
  • Pennsylvania (Sugarloaf): Holy Annunciation Monastery
  • Pennsylvania (Uniontown): Sisters of Saint Basil the Great
  • Washington (Olympia): Holy Theophany Monastery | Facebook

 

Other Eastern Catholic

Monasteries for Men:

Monasteries for Women:

  • None

 

 

Teachings of Christ

“You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.” (Matthew 5:43-44 ESV)

Lenten Prayer of St. Ephrem

O Lord and Master of my life, drive away from me the spirit of despondency, carelessness, love of power, and idle chatter. (Prostration)

Rather grant to me, Your servant, the spirit of wholeness of being, humility, patience, and love. (Prostration)

Yes, O Lord and King, grant that I may see my own faults and not condemn my brother; for You are blessed to the ages of ages. Amen. (Prostration)

Random Proverb

"Hear, O sons, a father's instruction, and be attentive, that you may gain insight, for I give you good precepts; do not forsake my teaching." (Proverbs 4:1,2 ESV)

Pray Without Ceasing

Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.

Wisdom from the Church Fathers

But if a person is constantly mindful of God, he will rejoice: as the psalmist says, "I remembered God, and I rejoiced" (Psalms 77:3). For when the intellect is gladdened by the remembrance of God, then it forgets the afflictions of this world, places its hope in Him, and is no longer troubled or anxious.

St. Peter of Damaskos, "JOY" (from "The 24 Discourses), "The Philokalia vol. III," - pp. 260 - 263.